Where to Watch the Game

This season brings college football and intriguing NFL action back to a bar near you. Because of the multitude of options—number of TVs, choice of beers on tap, best food—we’ve come up with this directory to guide you through the selection process.

8th & Union Kitchen

801 N. Union St., Wilmington; 654-9780
Number of TVs: 5
Beers on Tap: 16, Bottled Beers: 38
Crowd Favorites: half-price burgers, tacos, appetizers, and $1.25 oysters.

BBC Tavern & Grill

4019 Kennett Pike, Greenville; 655-3785
Number of TVs: 7
Beers on Tap: 15, Bottled Beers: 60-75
Crowd Favorites: Nachos, caprese salad, house-made meatloaf, and BBC Burger.

Big Fish Grill

720 Justison St., Wilmington; 652-3474
Number of TVs: 9
Beers on Tap: 7, Bottled Beers: 26
Crowd Favorites: Fresh, chef-inspired seafood dishes, large outdoor patio and lounge on the Riverfront.

Buffalo Wild Wings

Multiple locations: Bear, Dover, Limestone Rd.,
Middletown, Newark, Rehoboth
Number of TVs: 42
Beers on Tap: 24, Bottled Beers: 18
(Features sports lottery at Bear, Dover, Limestone Road and Middletown locations)
Crowd Favorites: Boneless or traditional wings in any of 16 signature seasonings or sauces.

Chelsea Tavern

821 N. Market St., Wilmington; 482-3333
Number of TVs: 4
Beers on Tap: 31, Bottled Beers: 214
Crowd Favorites: Wood burning oven pizza, Chelsea cheeseburger, and BBQ pork nachos.

Columbus Inn

2216 Pennsylvania Ave., Wilmington; 571-1492
Number of TVs: 5 (and a projector screen)
Beers on Tap: 8, Bottled Beers: 28
Crowd Favorites: Lobster fried rice, filet sandwich, and CI signature crab cakes.

Deer Park Tavern

108 W. Main St., Newark; 369-9414
Number of TVs: 21
Beers on Tap: 24, Bottled Beers: 31
Crowd Favorites: Wings, mix combo, and nachos.

Delaware Park

777 Delaware Park Blvd., Wilmington; 994-6700
Number of TVs: at least 37 at each location, including many 100-inch screens and one 150-incher
Beers on Tap: 5-6, Bottled Beers: 15
Three bars – Club 3, The Cove, and the Sports Bar – all featuring plenty of pro football action plus the sports lottery
Crowd Favorites: Flame-broiled cheeseburgers, dollar hot dogs, cheese pizzas from Picciottis, wing zings, jalapeno crab fritters, crab fries, crab cakes, and lobster.

Ernest & Scott Taproom

902 N. Market St., Wilmington; 384-8113
Number of TVs: 11
Beers on Tap: 29, Bottled Beers: 30
Crowd Favorites: Blackened mahi tacos, loaded fries, and burgers.

FireStone Roasting House

110 W. St., Wilmington; 658-6626
Number of TVs: 24
Beers on Tap: 8+, Bottled Beers: 30
Crowd Favorites: Firestone original pizza, spinach tomato ricotta pizza, and Firestone burger.

Gallucio’s

1709 Lovering Ave., Wilmington; 655-3689
Number of TVs: 8
Beers on Tap: 16, Bottled Beers: 15
Crowd Favorites: Pomodoro pizza, California turkey Ruben, sautéed seafood medley, stromboli, and homemade lasagna.

Grain Craft Bar + Kitchen

Newark, Bear and Kennett Square, Pa.
Number of TVs: 12
Beers on Tap: 24, Bottled Beers: 60
Crowd Favorites: Fried pickles, street tacos, and Cubano

The Greene Turtle

250 S. Main Street, Suite 101, Newark; 454-1592
Number of TVs: 48
Beers on Tap: 24, Bottled Beers: 30+
Crowd Favorites: Crab dip, Chesapeake burger, and hog hammers.

Grotto Pizza

16 locations in Delaware
Number of TVs: 15-25
Beers on Tap: 6-14, Bottled Beers: 16-22
Crowd Favorites: Boneless wings, appetizer combo, and broccoli bites.

Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant

Wilmington and Newark
Number of TVs: 4
Beers on Tap: 12-20, Bottled Beers: 7-9
Crowd Favorites: Cheesesteak eggrolls, voodoo chicken pizza, crab cake sandwich, petite filet mignon, scallops, and house nachos.

Kelly’s Logan House

1701 Delaware Ave., Wilmington; 652-9493
Number of TVs: 18 TVs including a big screen
Beers on Tap: 22, Bottled Beers: 18
Crowd Favorites: Buffalo wings, chili nachos, and dirty bird grilled cheese. 

Kid Shelleen’s

14th & Scott, Wilmington; 658-4600
Number of TVs: 6
Beers on Tap: 13, Bottled Beers: 55-60
Crowd Favorites: Shelleen’s nachos, buffalo wings, and chicken quesadilla.

McGlynn’s Pub

Three locations: Polly Drummond, People’s Plaza, Dover
Number of TVs: 22 with NFL Package, all games all week
Beers on Tap: 32, Bottled Beers: 40+
Crowd Favorites: Wings, nachos, burgers, and prime rib.

Mexican Post

3100 Naaman’s Rd., Wilmington; 478-3939
Number of TVs: 5
Beers on Tap: 5, Bottled Beers: 24
Crowd Favorites: Fajitas, chimichangas, and nachos.

Pike Creek Pub

4809 Limestone Rd., Wilmington; 235-8368
Number of TVs: 12
Beers on Tap: 8, Bottled Beers: 18
Crowd Favorites: All draft beers $3, Bud Light, Miller Lite, and Coronas are $3.

Route 2 Tavern

4305 Kirkwood Hwy, Wilmington; 256-0803 
Number of TVs: 15
Beers on Tap: 12, Bottled Beers: 15
Crowd Favorites: All draft beers are $3, Bud Light, Miller Lite, and Coronas are $3.

Stanley’s Tavern

2038 Foulk Rd., Wilmington; 475-1887
Number of TVs: 40
Beers on Tap: 25, Bottled Beers: 66
Crowd Favorites: Award-winning baby back ribs, wings, and tavern nachos. (Also features sports lottery.)

Stone Balloon Ale House

115 E. Main St., Newark; 266-8111
Number of TVs: 4
Beers on Tap: 16, Bottled Beers: 50
Crowd Favorites: Beef & bacon lollipops, keg fries, and short rib pot roast.

Tonic Bar & Grille

111 W. 11th Street, Wilmington
777-2040
Number of TVs: 15
Beers on Tap: 16, Bottled Beers: 24
Crowd Favorites: Crab cakes, fried calamari, and lobster tail.

Trolley Square Oyster House

1707 Delaware Ave, Wilmington;
384-7310
Number of TVs: 6
Beers on Tap: 16, Bottled Beers: 30
Crowd Favorites: Live music, open until 1am daily, Best of Delaware winner for lobster roll, and large raw bar.

Two Stones Pub

Three locations: Newark (294-1890),
Wilmington; (439-3231)
& Kennett Square (610-444-3940),
Number of TVs: 6-10
Beers on Tap: 20-25, Bottled Beers: 40-90 at each location
Crowd Favorites: Fry piles, hog wings, and chicken wings.

Washington Street Ale House

1206 Washington St., Wilmington
658-2537
Number of TVs: 9
Beers on Tap: 24, Bottled Beers: 20
Crowd Favorites: Draft beer selection and Sunday brunch with a build-your-own bloody mary bar.

The New Faces of Blue Hen Football

New Coach Danny Rocco with some of the in-state talent on his defense: (l-r) Colby Reeder, Grant Roberts and Troy Reeder. Photo Moonloop Photography

In their first season, UD’s head coach and AD have the players believing. The fans may be a harder sell.

Danny Rocco, who seven months ago was picked to lead the Delaware Blue Hens football team, is entering his 34th year of coaching—the last 11 as a head coach in the college ranks.

Football coaching is the Rocco family business, with dad Frank having been a longtime coach at both the high school and college levels; two brothers who spent their lives as high school coaches; and son David, who coaches wide receivers at Western Illinois.

After six years at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va., then five seasons with Richmond, Rocco, 57, was hired by first-year Athletic Director Chrissi Rawak as UD’s new head coach in December.

As a head coach, Rocco has never had a losing season, and he doesn’t plan on seeing that streak broken now as he leads the Hens into the 2017 campaign.

Athletic Director Chrissi Rawak arrived from Michigan last May. She hired Rocco in December.
Athletic Director Chrissi Rawak arrived from Michigan last May. She hired Rocco in December. Photo Moonloop Photography

“Success starts with high expectations, and Delaware expects to have a very competitive football team that’s smart, fast, and physical,” he says. “Our focus is on finishing better,” he adds, referring both to individual games and the season overall. “If we can finish better, we’ll be competitive.”

A competitive team is something die-hard fans like husband and wife Brian and Sarah Raughley have been waiting years to see again.

Brian, owner of Dead Presidents in Wilmington, and Sarah are long-time season ticket-holders and have spent many fall Saturday afternoons cheering on their alma mater at Delaware Stadium.

In fact, their midfield box has been in Sarah Raughley’s family for more than 50 years, and three generations of relatives from all over the state regularly gather in Newark for home games.

In recent years, however, both the on-field product and the highly unpopular University of Delaware Athletic Fund season-ticket tariff have dampened their enthusiasm.

“There’s a group of eight of us,” says Brian Raughley, “and one guy was ready to give up his ticket last year.”

That’s partly because Delaware is coming off two dreadful 4-7 years—the first back-to-back losing seasons since 1939—and a six-year postseason drought. One has to go back to 2010, when K.C. Keeler led the Hens to the FCS Championship Game, to relive some of that former Blue-and-Gold glory.

Asked about the slump, Rocco says, “As a coach, I’m always trying to identify problems without attaching blame. A number of things needed attention, including player development.”

Improving this area has been an early focus of his tenure, and seven months in, Rocco sounds upbeat.

“Things are going well. We’re off to a good start,” he says.

His boss agrees.

“He’s done all of the right things so far,” says Rawak. “Rocco’s done a tremendous job and I’m excited about the future.”

As for Brian and Sarah Raughley’s pessimistic box-seat companion?

“He decided to stick it out one more year after Coach Rocco was hired,” says Brian Raughley.

Four Coaches in 62 Years

Delaware football has a storied history that includes national championships, Hall of Fame coaches, NFL standouts and an enthusiastic fan base.

UD accumulated six national titles between 1946 and 2003, and is one of only two schools in the country to have three consecutive coaches enshrined in the College Football Hall of Fame: Bill Murray, David M. Nelson (who instituted UD’s famous Wing-T offense and gave Delaware the iconic Michigan-style “winged” helmet), and the now-legendary Harold “Tubby” Raymond, who retired in 2001.

When Keeler took over in 2002—only the fourth head man in 62 years—he brought with him a new offensive philosophy and installed a no-huddle, spread offense in place of the Wing-T.

He took Delaware to its last national championship – its first ever in Division I-AA—in 2003, but his teams lacked consistency over an 11-year tenure. Despite being given a 10-year contract extension in 2008, Keeler and UD parted ways after the 2012 season, when the Hens finished 5-6.

Rocco has made some changes of his own, the most significant being the installation of a 3-4 defense. This alignment dates to his stint as linebacker and special teams coach with the New York Jets in 2000.

He has stuck with the 3-4 because, he says, the extra linebackers add versatility and more depth on special teams. Also, he says, “it’s very hard to recruit defensive linemen at the CAA level.”

Former Concord High standout Grant Roberts, a senior defensive lineman with extensive game experience for the Hens, figures prominently in the new defense. Despite having to adjust to the new coaching staff and a new defense, the Wilmington native expects a big debut for the ‘17 Hens. “We expect to win. We all expect to be successful,” he says.

Roberts, who has 48 tackles (27 solo) to his credit entering his final season, would love to end his college career as a champion, but he isn’t getting ahead of himself.

“Our focus is first getting back to a winning season,” he says.

At Liberty and Richmond, Rocco, 57, never had a losing season. Photo Moonloop Photography
At Liberty and Richmond, Rocco, 57, never had a losing season. Photo Moonloop Photography

When Dave Brock became head coach in 2013, Roberts says, “Everyone was excited and there was a strong vibe going into the future.” But Brock managed just one winning season, and was fired midway through his fourth year. The Hens were 2-4 at the time, en route to another 4-7 finish.

Delaware’s football family is a tight-knit one, and people are loath to criticize Brock for the team’s downturn.

“Coach Brock was great,” Roberts insists.

But things clearly weren’t working and a change of direction was needed, so Brock’s firing wasn’t a surprise.

Roberts is focused on moving forward. “There were definitely some tough games—some of which we should’ve won – but … we had a talented roster even though things didn’t work out.”

Rocco admits the challenge of rebuilding Delaware’s program was one thing that drew him here.

“The biggest challenge was changing the culture and the expectations of the program,” he says. “Delaware lacked a unifying, confident culture among its student-athletes. They didn’t believe they could win.”

Rawak and Rocco are out to change that, and both understand they are “in this thing together.”

“Rebuilding this program,” says Rocco, “is truly a team effort. No one coach can change a culture alone.”

The Hens lost just three starters to graduation, so he sees a solid foundation on which to build.

“We have the right people at the right time,” he says. “I have confidence we can win.”

Rocco enjoyed immediate success at both Liberty University and at Richmond, where he turned a 3-8 team into one with an 8-3 record and a share of the CAA title in a single season.

That turnaround is partly why expectations are high that UD will return to its winning ways this season.  It’s also a major reason why Chrissi Rawak hired Rocco.

Immediate Impact

Rawak was executive senior associate athletic director for the University of Michigan when she was hired as the new AD by first-year Delaware President Denis Assanis last May. She wasted no time in making her presence felt.

A month after firing Brock, Rawak announced that, starting this year, the university would reverse the unpopular policy of requiring a donation to the UD Athletic Fund with most season ticket purchases. The policy, begun in 2011, helped boost UDAF coffers but alienated fans and contributed to a drastic reduction in both season ticket sales and attendance.

Then, in December, Rawak made what may be her most important move as AD to date: hiring Huntingdon, Pa., native Rocco as the new head coach.

Rocco was identified as a candidate early on and has an impressive résumé: in compiling a 90-42 record that includes six conference titles, he garnered four conference Coach of the Year honors and was a national FCS Coach of the Year finalist five times.

Rocco understands and appreciates Delaware football’s tradition, and he hopes to return the program to national prominence. He has his eyes set first on a conference championship. 

“If you’re competing for a conference championship at the CAA level, then you are nationally relevant,” he says. Eight wins would likely get the Hens into the postseason.

The new season begins in Newark on Aug. 31, against Delaware State. While recognizing there are several storylines that will have people talking in the fall—playing defending national FCS champs James Madison (Sept. 30) and Richmond (Oct. 21), both at home—the most important game for Rocco is DSU, “because it’s the next one up on the schedule.”

First Recruiting Class

“Success,” says Rocco, “also comes from identifying, recruiting and developing talent.” He has accomplished that at his other posts, and as a result his teams have won consistently.

At UD, after getting his staff in place, he focused on his first recruitment class, ensuring that the right student-athletes were being brought into the program.

His approach is, first, “to recruit character.” He and his staff look for young people with ambition, who want to succeed both as student-athletes and at life. “We care about our student-athletes as people—about their success on and off the field,” the head coach says.

“They need to be goal-oriented and highly-motivated,” he adds.

He is excited about his inaugural class, announced in late January.

“We recruited extraordinarily well despite a late start and new staff,” he says, noting the process was facilitated by the fact that the coaches themselves were willing to take a big risk on the program. “The families appreciated that,” says Rocco.

Delaware offered scholarships to 15 players; 14 accepted, marking Rocco’s highest success rate to date. Two players who had previously committed to Richmond changed their minds when Rocco left, and followed him to UD.

Rocco’s first group of incoming freshmen includes four wide receivers, a running back, a tight end, a defensive end, a defensive lineman, a defensive back, a linebacker, three offensive linemen and a quarterback.

That group includes offensive lineman Mickey Henry, a Wilmington native out of St. Elizabeth’s, and standout quarterback Nolan Henderson, of two-time Division I state champion Smyrna. The MVP of the annual Blue-Gold Game in June, Henderson holds many state records, including touchdown passes in a career—105.

He adds additional depth at quarterback, following the off-season transfer of J.P. Caruso from Appalachian State. Caruso was expected to compete for the top job with Joe Walker, Delaware’s starting quarterback the past two seasons. Rocco hadn’t decided going into camp in July who his starter would be.

“It’s all about who gives us the best chance to win,” Rocco told The Wilmington News Journal.

Brothers in Arms 

Another position where the Hens enjoy some depth is linebacker, thanks in part to brothers Troy and Colby Reeder, former standouts at Salesianum School. Both are former Delaware Defensive Players of the Year—Troy in 2013, Colby in 2015—and were heavily recruited.

Troy Reeder, 22, went to Penn State, where he started at linebacker as a red-shirt freshman, racking up 67 tackles, an interception and a pass breakup.

Colby, 20, followed in the footsteps of their father, former Wing-T fullback Dan Reeder, and enrolled at Delaware. (Dan Reeder is 12th on UD’s career rushing list, with 2,067 yards gained between 1982 and 1984; he later played for the Pittsburgh Steelers.)

The Reeder brothers were reunited last year when Troy transferred to UD to be with his younger brother. Troy doesn’t regret the decision. He says he and Colby have always been very close and bring out the best in each other. Playing college ball together was something the pair had dreamed of from the time they were little.

Rocco, who himself played linebacker for the Nittany Lions (1979-80) before finishing up at Wake Forest, has high praise for the Reeders.

“They’re doing really exciting work, they’re good role models,” Rocco says. “Troy is exactly what you’re looking for in a football player.”

Troy, a captain of this year’s squad, is excited to be home and starting a new season

“There’s no pressure on the players at all,” he says. “Everyone knows what this team is capable of and that we underachieved last year.”

Colby, who was redshirted his freshman year due to injury, is now healthy and ready to compete for a starting job. “I expect to see significant playing time this year,” he says.

Colby admits to some friendly competition between the brothers in the weight room, but that’s where any sibling rivalry ends. On the field, the more experienced Troy “helps me out a lot, and we work together well,” says Colby.

The Old Guard

For long-time fans, the Reeders may evoke memories of two other well-known Blue Hen brothers—Michael and Joseph Purzycki.

Mike Purzycki (Class of ’67), a standout wide receiver who set multiple records at Delaware, including becoming UD’s first-ever 1,000-career yard receiver, was elected Mayor of Wilmington last November.

Younger brother Joe (Class of ’70), recruited by Tubby Raymond, was an All-America defensive back who recorded a then-record nine interceptions in 1969, his senior year. He returned to UD as a defensive backfield coach under Raymond in 1978, a year before the Hens took the Division II title.

Joe Purzycki was on the search committee that hired Rawak. She, in turn, asked Purzycki, as well as former NFL quarterbacks Rich Gannon and Scott Brunner, for their input when seeking Brock’s replacement.

Rocco says he’s received strong support from Gannon, Brunner, both Purzyckis and others. “They’ve all been great,” he says. “They genuinely care and want what’s best for Delaware.”

Joe Purzycki, whose deep love for UD football is palpable, says of the new head coach, “Rocco is a good fit for UD. He’s cut from the same mold as earlier Delaware coaches. A football coach is who he is.”

Purzycki is impressed with Rocco’s winning record and the turnaround he effected at Richmond. A former college head coach himself (DSU, JMU), Purzycki knows the effort that requires.

Just as impressive, says Purzycki, was that during the search, “everyone who had coached either for or against Rocco over the years had nothing but the highest praise for him.”

“He’s worked for some of the best coaches in the business,” he adds, including former Jets Head Coach Al Groh, and Tom Coughlin, who led the New York Giants to two Super Bowl titles. 

“You can’t be surrounded by such talent and not have some of it rub off on you,” says Purzycki.

If Rocco is feeling any pressure to produce results immediately, he doesn’t let on.

“It’s hard to put a time line on the rebuilding project, but I expect this year’s team to be competitive,” he reaffirms, sounding cautiously optimistic yet enthusiastic about the year ahead.

“You can’t just jam a program into a model and be successful—things need massaging,” he says.

When announcing the hiring in December, Rawak said Rocco’s impact would be felt immediately, but she also recognizes it takes time to build programs. She insists she hasn’t given Rocco a timetable for markedly improved on-the-field performance. But, she says, “When we step on the field, we play to win.”

While acknowledging that the record at the end of the 2107 season will be important, she says she also deeply values the process needed to get to where UD wants to be.

“There is always lots to learn, and the focus is on always getting better,” she says.

For their part, the players—the most important part of the process—are optimistic.

“Something really special is happening,” says Troy Reeder. “The players are buying into [Rocco’s] philosophy of winning each day, one day at a time.”

Blue Hen fans hope the captain is right.

The O&A Interview: Wendell Smallwood

The rookie from Delaware prepares to earn playing time with the Eagles, his favorite NFL team

Delaware’s own Wendell Smallwood realized a childhood dream in April when he was chosen by the Philadelphia Eagles in the fifth round of the NFL draft. Smallwood, originally from Wilmington, played his first three high school seasons at Red Lion Christian Academy in Bear before finishing at Eastern Christian Academy in Elkton.

He went on to West Virginia, where he had an impressive senior year in 2015. He was named the Mountaineers’ offensive player of the year while earning All-Big 12 second-team honors after scoring 12 touchdowns and setting career highs with 1,519 yards on 238 carries, for an average of 6.4 yards. Also a threat as a receiver, he had 68 career receptions for 618 yards (9.1 avg.), finishing fifth all-time among running backs in WVU history in both receptions and receiving yards.

In the latest Eagles depth chart, Smallwood is listed third at running back behind no. 1 Ryan Matthews and Darren Sproles. West Virginia used him largely as a safety valve in the flats, rarely asking him to protect the quarterback, so experts have speculated that this inexperience as a pass protector could limit his playing time in his rookie season. While he needs to improve that part of his game, he could see significant playing time if Matthews, who has a history of injuries, misses some time.

O&A caught up to Smallwood not long after the Eagles final OTA (optional team activities) and prior to the opening of training camp on July 24. Speaking by phone from his new digs near Lincoln Financial Field, Smallwood discussed his NFL experience thus far, his support system, and his plan to complete his education.

Last season at West Virginia, Smallwood ran for 1,519 yards on 238 carries, for an average of 6.4 yards. (Photo courtesy of Brent Kepner/WVU)
Last season at West Virginia, Smallwood ran for 1,519 yards on 238 carries, for an average of 6.4 yards.
(Photo courtesy of Brent Kepner/WVU)

O&A: Were you an Eagles fan growing up?
WS: Yes. Brian Westbrook, Deuce Staley—I remember watching them growing up. And Shady (McCoy, now with the Buffalo Bills), of course. I was kind of star-struck when I met Deuce.

O&A: Yes, Deuce is your position coach now. How is he as a coach?
WS: He’s a great coach. And I think he’s the reason I’m an Eagle. [He scouted me] and he really liked me.

O&A: What has been the most surprising aspect of moving from the college game to the NFL?
WS: Just the way the coaches pay attention to really little stuff, details. Everything matters. It makes the difference between winning, losing and whether you play. Even some off-the-field stuff, like being somewhere on time for appointments and events, is important to them.

O&A: How about the speed of the game?
WS: It’s definitely faster. I would say it’s similar to the transition from high school to college. And there are more schemes, more defenses hiding things. But the more reps I got, the more it slowed down.

O&A: How have they divided the reps in practice so far? Are you getting nearly the same number as Matthews and Sproles?
WS: I got a lot of reps, especially when Sproles was gone. I’ve been running with the twos and threes, and the ones a little bit. I’m on all the special teams except punt returns. The special teams coach thinks I can do it at a fast level. I did the same thing in my freshman year in college.

O&A: Has there been any hazing of you rookies?
WS: No. Our team might be one of the best when it comes to that, based on some of the rookies I know and talked to. We do have to fill up the refrigerator, mostly with Gatorade and water, and we have to bring them [the veterans] candy. They like candy.

O&A: So you won’t have to sing the West Virginia alma mater during training camp?
WS: I may have to, but if I do I won’t mind at all.

O&A: Do you know the alma mater?
WS: No, I’ll have to learn it.

O&A: What’s Head Coach Doug Pederson like?
WS: He’s a cool guy. He’s straight up with you. And he pays attention to everything you do, even when you think he’s not watching. And he’s open to doing things different ways if that’s what’s comfortable for us.

O&A: So would you call him a players’ coach?
WS: Definitely.

Smallwood plans to get the 18 credits he needs for a criminology degree from WVU. (Photo courtesy of Pete Emerson/WVU)
Smallwood plans to get the 18 credits he needs for a criminology degree from WVU.
(Photo courtesy of Pete Emerson/WVU)

O&A: How are you interacting with the other backs? Are the veterans helping you or is the competition too intense for that?
WS: I’ve been talking to each and every one of the other guys. They take me out to eat, and they definitely are looking out for me. Anything I need to know, they tell me. There’s definitely competition, we all want to start, but we’re just like one unit, not individuals, just trying to win games together.

O&A: How’s your weight? Have you bulked up for the NFL? How about your speed? What’s your 40 time?
WS: No, I haven’t put on weight. I’m at about 210. They want me between 205 and 210. I ran a 4.44 at the Combine and my pro day time (at West Virginia) was 4.38.

O&A: What’s your support system like—family, advisors, former coaches?
WS: I talk to the coaches from Eastern Christian every day, and also to Dave Sills (who was a key figure in the football programs at both Red Lion and Eastern Christian). I talk to my parents, even though they aren’t together. And I talk to my running backs coach from college every day—Ja’Juan Seider.

O&A: Have you had much interaction with fans, here or in Philly?
WS: Yeah, they’ve been great. I just did an autograph session at Concord Mall and I’ll be going to the ice cream festival (at Rockwood Park). A lot of people in Delaware have my information and I try to do what I can when they contact me.

O&A: I know you’ve addressed this previously with the media, but can you comment on the issues from your past—the witness intimidation and the tweets about Philly? (In 2014, Smallwood was charged with trying to get a witness in a murder case to recant her statement implicating his friend. The charge was eventually dropped. Also, after he was drafted, Eagles fans discovered some crude tweets he posted in 2011 that were critical of Philadelphia, in the context of a rivalry between inner-city youth there and in Wilmington. Smallwood quickly took down the account).
WS: The charge came down to there was never any evidence against me. All the charges were dropped. I never did try to intimidate anyone. I was just caught up in a bad situation, and I was 100 percent cooperative with the police. With the tweets, I was young and I sure don’t feel that way about Philly. I took full responsibility for it. I’ve always been around the city and I love the city.

O&A: Do you have your degree from West Virginia, and if not are you planning to earn it? What was your major?
WS: I’m 18 credits short of a degree in criminology. I plan to take three credits this fall and plan to get my degree. I’ll take courses throughout my career until I get it. It never occurred to me not to do that.